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“Tempus Fugit, Memento Mori”

The Trappist Monks, known for their strict observance of monastic life of silence, prayer, work and study used to greet one another with the greeting “Memento Mori.” “Memento mori” can be translated as “Remember death.” A translation that can have more impact is: “Remember that you will die.” In Pilipino, “Alalahanin mo, mamamatay ka rin.” This greeting is a reminder of one’s mortality and the need to live faithfully in this world. Life is short; live your life well.

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The Seventh Commandment: “Thou Shall Not Steal” by Fr. Robert Manansala, OFM

The 7th Commandment of the Decalogue — found in Exodus 20:15 and Deuteronomy 5:19 —  is formulated in the negative form as “Thou shall not steal.”  “Respect the goods of others” can be one of its positive formulations. Some Biblical scholars say that because of the peculiar grammatical construction in Hebrew, this Commandment “does notContinue reading “The Seventh Commandment: “Thou Shall Not Steal” by Fr. Robert Manansala, OFM”

Finding Joy in Celebrating Christmas with my Parish Community by Johan Ferrer

I always look forward to our Parish events, such as the Buling-Buling, Easter and the Parish Fiesta, and most especially the Christmas Activities. Aside from the Misa de Gallo and the parties, there are also recollections, outreach programs, and the many ways of giving by the different ministries. I attended the PGH Ministry’s gift-giving onContinue reading “Finding Joy in Celebrating Christmas with my Parish Community by Johan Ferrer”

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